Discussion:
need some help about organize message in mutt
Yubin Ruan
2016-08-01 13:18:13 UTC
Permalink
I think I must be a newbie in mutt-user community. So, hi all.
I need some help here. I want to know how to organize all the message in gmail
inbox. I used to the Thunderbird email client. Frankly it's a pretty nice email
client, with a cool feature call `message-filter`. It can move some messages to
some mailbox according to the pattern you give it. For example, it can move all
the messages whose `To` field in header contains `mutt-***@mutt.org` to a
mailbox/folder call `mutt-user`. This can even automatically happed when I start
Thunderbird. This help me keep my inbox clean when I have subscribed to a lot of
mailing lists. But when my emails get overflow and my network connection get bad,
Thunderbird would crash. Yes, it suck. That's the reason why I switch to using Mutt.

I know mutt can do pretty much the same things. But I don't know how to
exactly configure it. I try the instruction on the manual but thing just
doesn't work.
For example, in the index mode, I press `<shift>T`, and then
`some-header-string`, trying to tagged all the message that are sent to
`mutt-***@mutt.org`. But that doesn't work. So bad. I try some others, can't
make it yet.
Can anyone tell me,
** How can I have that Thunderbird message filtering in mutt?(i.e., moving
some messages from inbox to other mailbox according to the `To` field or `Cc`
field)
** Is those ~ in mutt's manual(~e, ~T, ~B, etc.) stand for the <shift>
key?(I guess so because I have tried both `~T` and `<shift>T`, and only `<shift>T`
have some effect.) If that is, seriously, why can't the author just place
something like <shift> or <S> in the manual? and what does the =, % prefix mean?

Thanks,
Ruan
Thomas Schneider
2016-08-01 14:42:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yubin Ruan
How can I have that Thunderbird message filtering in mutt?
I have been using procmail to filter mail into different mail boxes. Then I look at
those boxes with mutt under a script that opens each one. This allows me to categorize
my junk mail and then move them to my main mail box if I want to keep one.

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=procmail

Tom
Erik Christiansen
2016-08-02 10:27:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Thomas Schneider
Post by Yubin Ruan
How can I have that Thunderbird message filtering in mutt?
I have been using procmail to filter mail into different mail boxes.
Then I look at those boxes with mutt under a script that opens each
one. This allows me to categorize my junk mail and then move them to
my main mail box if I want to keep one.
There's no need for any script. Once procmail has sorted incoming mail
into a bunch of mailboxes, e.g. one per mailing list, etc., then in
.muttrc, something like:

mailboxes +/family_u /var/spool/mail/erik +/avr_gcc_u +/vim_u +/mutt_u
mailboxes +/procmail_u +/todo +/cnc_linux_u +/luv-main +/binutils_u
mailboxes ~/postponed # So it's accessible in the 'y' list.

Now mutt presents the highest priority mailbox which has new mail, and
'c' changes folder to the next highest with new mail, skipping any stale
ones in between.

I have some simple spam filtering, and should maybe add +/spam as the
last mailbox, as a reminder to look in there once in a blue moon for
false positives.

The stuff I want to keep goes into ~ 1200 categorised mailboxes.

Erik
c***@zip.com.au
2016-08-01 23:00:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yubin Ruan
I think I must be a newbie in mutt-user community. So, hi all.
Hi, and welcome!
Post by Yubin Ruan
I need some help here. I want to know how to organize all the message in gmail
inbox. I used to the Thunderbird email client. Frankly it's a pretty nice email
client, with a cool feature call `message-filter`. It can move some messages to
some mailbox according to the pattern you give it. For example, it can move all
mailbox/folder call `mutt-user`. This can even automatically happed when I start
Thunderbird. This help me keep my inbox clean when I have subscribed to a lot of
mailing lists.
Yes, most of us do something similar.
Post by Yubin Ruan
I know mutt can do pretty much the same things. But I don't know how to
exactly configure it. I try the instruction on the manual but thing just
doesn't work.
For example, in the index mode, I press `<shift>T`, and then
`some-header-string`, trying to tagged all the message that are sent to
make it yet.
"T" (upper case "t" == <shift>T) is bound to the <tag-pattern> command.
Tagging is briefly described in the "Using Tags" section:

http://www.mutt.org/doc/manual/#tags

With <tag-pattern>, the string you type at its prompt is a pattern, documented
here:

http://www.mutt.org/doc/manual/#patterns

If you just type a simple string such as mutt-***@mutt.org then that is
considered a "simple search". These are described in the section above, under
the table of modifiers. If you want to be more precise, you can use a modifier
such as:

~C mutt-***@mutt.org

to match messages with that in the To or CC headers.

All this does is _tag_ the matching messages. You can then move them by issuing
a <save-message> command, bound to "s". That normally works on the current
message, but you can have it work on all the tagged messages by issuing the
<tag-prefix> command first, bound to ";". So typing this:

;s

says to mutt that it should save all of the tagged messages to a folder. You
will be proompted for that folder name.
Post by Yubin Ruan
Can anyone tell me,
** How can I have that Thunderbird message filtering in mutt?(i.e., moving
some messages from inbox to other mailbox according to the `To` field or `Cc`
field)
** Is those ~ in mutt's manual(~e, ~T, ~B, etc.) stand for the <shift>
key?(I guess so because I have tried both `~T` and `<shift>T`, and only `<shift>T`
have some effect.) If that is, seriously, why can't the author just place
something like <shift> or <S> in the manual? and what does the =, % prefix mean?
No, the "~" is a literal tilde character. It does _not_ mean <shift>. The ~T,
~B etc operators are "pattern modifiers" for use in expressions which match
messages. So:

~f ***@zip.com.au

would match any message from me ("***@zip.com.au" in the From: header). They are
case insensitive: "~t" and "~T" do different things; see the table of pattern
modifiers here:

http://www.mutt.org/doc/manual/#tab-patterns

You can write arbitrary Boolean expressions with this stuff. Broadly:

~ introduces a pattern modifier expression, often it will accept a regular
expression as its argument

= a few modifers come with "=", for expressions which search on the server
(== the IMAP server); they accept a fixed string, not a regular expression.

% modifers which match against groups. You can define groups of mail
% addresses in mutt, and ask for messages which involve those addresses.

While all this lets you search for and optionally move or copy or delete etc
messages, authomatic message filing is usually _not_ done by mutt itself. (Al
though you could by running a few commands automatically when mutt commences,
but managing that gets tedious very quickly).

Normal practice for mutt users is to file messages with a separate program as
they are collected. This works best with local storage: we collect our email
from the server with POP or IMAP and store in local folders on our computers.
We can walk you through setting up such an arrangement if you decide you want
to go this way.

If you're using GMail and wanting to keep your messages there I would recommend
setting up filter rules in GMail itself: it is capable of autofiling new
messages for you. The rules are a little crude, but they cover the common
cases.

Cheers,
Cameron Simpson <***@zip.com.au> (who is actually wearing a black t-shirt today)
Yubin Ruan
2016-08-02 00:05:26 UTC
Permalink
really appreciate your help.
Post by c***@zip.com.au
to match messages with that in the To or CC headers.
I have tried that, but when I press that ~ key, mutt give me some "key is not
bound. Press ? for help" message.(when I say I press the ~ key, I mean I press
<shift>~ , which would give you a ~ when you do normal typing, otherwise it's
just a ` ) That's weird. I have no idea why, but I guess maybe that's because of
my configuration setting, part of which I copy directly from other's blog:

set index_format='%-20.20L %4C [%Z] %{%b %d} %-15.15F (%?l?%4l&%4c?) %s'
color index green default ~N # new
color index red default ~D # deleted
color index brightmagenta default ~T # tagged
color index brightyellow default ~F # flagged
set pager_index_lines=10
bind index,pager \Ck sidebar-prev #previous folder in sidebar
bind index,pager \Cj sidebar-next #next folder in sidebar
bind index,pager \CO sidebar-open #open selected folder in sidebar
macro index b '<enter-command>toggle sidebar_visible<enter><refresh>'
macro index \cb '<enter-command>toggle sidebar_visible<enter><refresh>'
bind index d display-message
bind index gg first-entry
bind index G last-entry
bind index h noop
bind index l noop

that's all of my conf that are related to index view. Anything wrong ?
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Can anyone tell me,
** How can I have that Thunderbird message filtering in mutt?(i.e., moving
some messages from inbox to other mailbox according to the `To` field or `Cc`
field)
** Is those ~ in mutt's manual(~e, ~T, ~B, etc.) stand for the <shift>
key?(I guess so because I have tried both `~T` and `<shift>T`, and only `<shift>T`
have some effect.) If that is, seriously, why can't the author just place
something like <shift> or <S> in the manual? and what does the =, % prefix mean?
No, the "~" is a literal tilde character. It does _not_ mean
<shift>. The ~T, ~B etc operators are "pattern modifiers" for use in
header). They are case insensitive: "~t" and "~T" do different
things;>
~f doesn't work either, because the ~ is not bound(as described above)
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Normal practice for mutt users is to file messages with a separate
we collect our email from the server with POP or IMAP and store in
local folders on our computers. We can walk you through setting up
such an arrangement if you decide you want to go this way.
If there's some common practice I would really appreciate to hear some. Figuring
it out myself is kind of hard.
Post by c***@zip.com.au
If you're using GMail and wanting to keep your messages there I
would recommend setting up filter rules in GMail itself: it is
capable of autofiling new messages for you. The rules are a little
crude, but they cover the common cases.
Does gmail really have that filter-move functionality? I have searched through
nearly all of gmail's setting, but all I can find is something that only let
you filter the inbox and get a clean view. It can't move the messages that have
been filtered out to other mailbox.
Or do I miss something?
Post by c***@zip.com.au
who is actually wearing a black t-shirt today
black t-shirt is cool, I like it and wear it every day :-)

regards,
Ruan
Erik Christiansen
2016-08-02 11:00:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yubin Ruan
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Normal practice for mutt users is to file messages with a separate
we collect our email from the server with POP or IMAP and store in
local folders on our computers. We can walk you through setting up
such an arrangement if you decide you want to go this way.
If there's some common practice I would really appreciate to hear some. Figuring
it out myself is kind of hard.
Hey, this is *nix. It's only when someone says "You're all individuals."
that any of is likely to pipe up from the back with "I'm not!". ;-)

Googling for "procmail howto" showed more help than an average
old-school user would normally need, first up.
But there is much procmail config guidance in the procmailrc manpage.
(And it's first line says: "For a quick start, see NOTES at the end of
the procmail(1) man page." That shows how it might be automatically
invoked.
There's also "man procmailex" for useful examples.
Subscribing to the procmail mailing list would help while learning.

While learning, it might also be an idea to use an initial copying
recipe to duplicate all incoming mail in a backup mailbox, since it is
possible to lose mails by writing a faulty delivery recipe. (Look for
"safety net" in "man procmailex".

The manpages seem to be included in the procmail .deb package - at least
I don't see a procmail-doc package to bother with.

Erik
Ian Zimmerman
2016-08-02 23:25:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik Christiansen
Googling for "procmail howto" showed more help than an average
old-school user would normally need, first up.
But there is much procmail config guidance in the procmailrc manpage.
(And it's first line says: "For a quick start, see NOTES at the end of
the procmail(1) man page." That shows how it might be automatically
invoked.
There's also "man procmailex" for useful examples.
Subscribing to the procmail mailing list would help while learning.
While learning, it might also be an idea to use an initial copying
recipe to duplicate all incoming mail in a backup mailbox, since it is
possible to lose mails by writing a faulty delivery recipe. (Look for
"safety net" in "man procmailex".
The manpages seem to be included in the procmail .deb package - at least
I don't see a procmail-doc package to bother with.
I wonder what portion of serious procmail users do what I do - treat it
as the assembler of mail processing, and "compile" the rules from a more
approachable format.

Over the last year plus, I tried YAML and JSON but finally I settled on
a sweetly simple flat file format which I run off with awk.
--
Please *no* private Cc: on mailing lists and newsgroups
Why does the arrow on Hillary signs point to the right?
c***@zip.com.au
2016-08-03 05:17:37 UTC
Permalink
This post might be inappropriate. Click to display it.
Paul Tansom
2016-08-03 22:08:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Ian Zimmerman
Post by Erik Christiansen
While learning, it might also be an idea to use an initial copying
recipe to duplicate all incoming mail in a backup mailbox, since it is
possible to lose mails by writing a faulty delivery recipe. (Look for
"safety net" in "man procmailex".
The manpages seem to be included in the procmail .deb package - at least
I don't see a procmail-doc package to bother with.
I wonder what portion of serious procmail users do what I do - treat it
as the assembler of mail processing, and "compile" the rules from a more
approachable format.
http://freecode.com/projects/cats2procmailrc
http://cskk.ezoshosting.com/cs/css/manuals/cats2procmailrc.1.html
but eventually procmail became too cumbersome and slow (not to mention, um,
approximate in its conditions) and I bit the bullet and wrote my own filer
http://cskk.ezoshosting.com/cs/css/manuals/mailfiler.1.html
http://cskk.ezoshosting.com/cs/css/manuals/mailfiler.5.html
Post by Ian Zimmerman
Over the last year plus, I tried YAML and JSON but finally I settled on
a sweetly simple flat file format which I run off with awk.
Yes, a simple syntax is very helpful.
** end quote [***@zip.com.au]

I got fed up with procmail a few years ago, but given that I run my own mail
server and use IMAP I switched to sieve scripts, which I've found surprisingly
straight forward to work with - mayby I'm just not doing anything massively
complicated! The one I'm working on now is proving slightly more trouble though
- not the sieve script itself, but giving Outlook users the ability to manage
it to set and disable automated holiday/away responses. Currently Horde or
Roundcube are looking the simplest option, even if they are both overkill by a
significant margin - all the sieve only solutions for this look somewhat
technical for the end user to work with.
--
Paul Tansom | Aptanet Ltd. | https://www.aptanet.com/ | 023 9238 0001
Vice Chair, FSB Portsmouth & SE Hampshire Branch | http://www.fsb.org.uk/
=============================================================================
Registered in England | Company No: 4905028 | Registered Office: Ralls House,
Parklands Business Park, Forrest Road, Denmead, Waterlooville, Hants, PO7 6XP
Ian Zimmerman
2016-08-04 03:50:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Paul Tansom
I got fed up with procmail a few years ago, but given that I run my
own mail server and use IMAP I switched to sieve scripts, which I've
found surprisingly straight forward to work with - mayby I'm just not
doing anything massively complicated! The one I'm working on now is
proving slightly more trouble though
I love Sieve, and I used it for a long while. The problem is that there
is no standalone implementation - all of them are part of some humongous
IMAP/POP server package. I want to read my mail locally, so this would
be the _only_ reason for such server package to be installed. My sense
of economy revolts.
--
Please *no* private Cc: on mailing lists and newsgroups
Why does the arrow on Hillary signs point to the right?
Mark H. Wood
2016-08-04 16:41:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Zimmerman
Post by Paul Tansom
I got fed up with procmail a few years ago, but given that I run my
own mail server and use IMAP I switched to sieve scripts, which I've
found surprisingly straight forward to work with - mayby I'm just not
doing anything massively complicated! The one I'm working on now is
proving slightly more trouble though
I love Sieve, and I used it for a long while. The problem is that there
is no standalone implementation - all of them are part of some humongous
IMAP/POP server package. I want to read my mail locally, so this would
be the _only_ reason for such server package to be installed. My sense
of economy revolts.
Yes, Sieve looks sensible, but the only implementation I could easily
lay hands on is built into Exim. Meanwhile, when I began to struggle
with procmail, I switched to maildrop. I could wish for more help in
testing new filter expressions, but it mostly works the way I think.
--
Mark H. Wood
Lead Technology Analyst

University Library
Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis
755 W. Michigan Street
Indianapolis, IN 46202
317-274-0749
www.ulib.iupui.edu
Erik Christiansen
2016-08-03 09:47:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Zimmerman
I wonder what portion of serious procmail users do what I do - treat it
as the assembler of mail processing, and "compile" the rules from a more
approachable format.
Over the last year plus, I tried YAML and JSON but finally I settled on
a sweetly simple flat file format which I run off with awk.
That sounds interesting. Is there a manpage for the input language?
I'm sympathetic to the idea, and awk would be my language of choice for
the preprocessor too, but procmail recipes seem eminently manageable.
(That may have something to do with a career spent in embedded systems
development, where assembler programming remained a significant
component for three decades, and I cheerfully drew that straw, relishing
it even as we moved from one target to another.)

Erik
Ian Zimmerman
2016-08-03 15:48:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Erik Christiansen
Post by Ian Zimmerman
Over the last year plus, I tried YAML and JSON but finally I settled on
a sweetly simple flat file format which I run off with awk.
That sounds interesting. Is there a manpage for the input language?
No, but appended there is a massively snipped example.

Notes:

1. The generated procmail rules make sure only one copy of each message
is delivered to each mailbox, even if the message matches multiple rules
with that destination.

2. The "rss" rules are for messages from my tuxfeeder tool [1].

3. The "ng" rules are for messages fetched from usenet by *suck* and
emailed to me by a cronjob.


# alternate addresses of mine (jobs etc.)
dst ***@bugs.debian.org mail.net.debian.bugs
dst foobar+***@gmail.com mail.net.debian.bugs
# sender addresses
snd ***@iccf.com mail.com.iccf
snd ***@iccf-webchess.com mail.com.iccf
snd ***@craigslist.org jobs.craigslist
snd ***@servicenet.com mail.com.newegg
# sender domains
dom bugs.debian.org mail.net.debian.bugs
dom smci.com jobs.smci
dom smcinews.com jobs.smci
dom hq.bill.com mail.com.billcom
dom linode.com mail.com.linode
dom meetup.com mail.com.meetup
dom newegg.com mail.com.newegg
dom online-go.com mail.com.ogs
dom paypal.com mail.com.paypal
dom questgroups.com jobs.misc
# RSS/Atom feeds
rss FJOB jobs.functionaljobs
rss DDSA feed.dsa
rss MAGN feed.magnatune
rss DEDE feed.epstein
rss EXIS feed.existential
rss GAGA feed.gagallium
rss LAMB feed.lambda
rss MACO feed.bauer
rss OCHA feed.ocharles
rss AMIR feed.chaudhry
rss ERRA feed.erratique
rss GJOB jobs.github
rss MEMA feed.masteringemacs
rss DEBU feed.debuntu
rss ADMI feed.debadmi
rss GLSA feed.glsa
rss LINO feed.linode
rss EWFX feed.ewontfix
rss IXLK feed.indexluke
# mailing lists
# fscking mutt-users has no list-id
dst mutt-***@mutt.org mail.net.mutt-users mutt-***@mutt.org
ml colorhug-users.googlegroups.com mail.net.colorhug-users
ml caml-list.inria.fr mail.net.caml-list caml-***@inria.fr caml-***@yquem.inria.fr
ml compilers.lists.iecc.com mail.net.compilers
ml coq-club.inria.fr mail.net.coq-club
ml exim-users.exim.org mail.net.exim-users
ml geeqie-devel.lists.sourceforge.net mail.net.geeqie-devel
ml group-pub-forum.lists.maths.bath.ac.uk mail.net.group-pub-forum
ml haskell-cafe.haskell.org mail.net.haskell-cafe
ml hol-info.lists.sourceforge.net mail.net.hol-info
ml mlton-user.lists.sourceforge.net mail.net.mlton-user mlton-***@mlton.org mlton-***@lists.sourceforge.net
ml openbox.icculus.org mail.net.openbox
ml polyml.inf.ed.ac.uk mail.net.polyml
ml ssreflect.msr-inria.inria.fr mail.net.coq-club
ml types-list.lists.seas.upenn.edu mail.net.types-list
ml users.spamassassin.apache.org mail.net.spamassassin.users
ml texhax.tug.org mail.net.texhax ***@tug.org ***@tug.org
ml gentoo-user.gentoo.org mail.net.gentoo-user gentoo-***@lists.gentoo.org
ml sml-evolution.mailman.cs.uchicago.edu mail.net.sml-evolution
# usenet newsgroups
ng comp.compilers mail.net.compilers
ng comp.mail.mutt usenet.mutt
ng comp.os.linux.networking usenet.networking
ng comp.text.tex usenet.tex
ng comp.unix.programmer usenet.programmer
ng comp.unix.shell usenet.shell
ng rec.games.bridge usenet.bridge
ng comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.misc usenet.freebsd.misc
ng comp.unix.bsd.freebsd.announce usenet.freebsd.announce

[1]
https://github.com/nobrowser/tuxfeeder
--
Please *no* private Cc: on mailing lists and newsgroups
Why does the arrow on Hillary signs point to the right?
Gabriel Philippe
2016-08-04 12:36:28 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Erik Christiansen
Post by Erik Christiansen
Subscribing to the procmail mailing list would help while learning.
Does it still exist? procmail.org is down for several months.

From the manual page of procmail: "There exists a mailinglist for
questions relating to any program in the procmail package:
<procmail-users-***@procmail.org> for subscription requests.".
Hoewever:
550 5.1.1 <procmail-users-***@procmail.org>: Recipient address
rejected: User unknown
--
Gabriel
Patrick Shanahan
2016-08-04 13:27:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Gabriel Philippe
On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Erik Christiansen
Post by Erik Christiansen
Subscribing to the procmail mailing list would help while learning.
Does it still exist? procmail.org is down for several months.
Post by Erik Christiansen
From the manual page of procmail: "There exists a mailinglist for
rejected: User unknown
I still receive mail from the procmail list, several in the last two
weeks, but few...
--
(paka)Patrick Shanahan Plainfield, Indiana, USA @ptilopteri
http://en.opensuse.org openSUSE Community Member facebook/ptilopteri
http://wahoo.no-ip.org Photo Album: http://wahoo.no-ip.org/gallery2
Registered Linux User #207535 @ http://linuxcounter.net
Erik Christiansen
2016-08-06 06:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Patrick Shanahan
Post by Gabriel Philippe
On Tue, Aug 2, 2016 at 1:00 PM, Erik Christiansen
Post by Erik Christiansen
Subscribing to the procmail mailing list would help while learning.
Does it still exist? procmail.org is down for several months.
Post by Erik Christiansen
From the manual page of procmail: "There exists a mailinglist for
rejected: User unknown
Ah, yes, a DNS "dig" on procmail.org fails, and a visit to:
http://www.procmail.org/ gives:
"Site hosting in transit, information will be back up shortly."
However, from the headers of a recent list post we have:

List-Subscribe:
<http://MailMan.RWTH-Aachen.DE/mailman/listinfo/procmail>,
<mailto:procmail-***@lists.RWTH-Aachen.DE?subject=subscribe>

In contrast, that http link is up, so either method should work.
Post by Patrick Shanahan
I still receive mail from the procmail list, several in the last two
weeks, but few...
That's curious, as the last message in my procmail inbox is from June
3rd. My mail log also shows none more recent, so it's not just that I've
deleted more recent arrivals.

Viewing the archive by date:
http://mailman.rwth-aachen.de/pipermail/procmail/2016-June/date.html
confirms that the most recent post is Fri Jun 3 00:56:14 CEST 2016.

Gabriel, it is a low-traffic list, so a quiet period does not confirm
that the list is down. Would you like to post a query, then we'll see.

Patrick, could you please confirm newer traffic? As a long-term
subscriber, I'd be irked by having been spontaneously dropped off.
There's then also be the archive to be fixed.

Erik
Gabriel Philippe
2016-08-06 10:05:12 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, Aug 6, 2016 at 8:10 AM, Erik Christiansen
Post by Erik Christiansen
"Site hosting in transit, information will be back up shortly."
According to archive.org, this has not changed since at least the
beginning of 2016.
Post by Erik Christiansen
<http://MailMan.RWTH-Aachen.DE/mailman/listinfo/procmail>,
Well, this is a German university and probably not official, but at
least I'm now there and have said "hi". Thanks Erik!
--
Gabriel
Patrick Shanahan
2016-08-06 10:56:13 UTC
Permalink
* Erik Christiansen <***@internode.on.net> [08-06-16 02:16]:
[...]
Post by Erik Christiansen
In contrast, that http link is up, so either method should work.
Post by Patrick Shanahan
I still receive mail from the procmail list, several in the last two
weeks, but few...
That's curious, as the last message in my procmail inbox is from June
3rd. My mail log also shows none more recent, so it's not just that I've
deleted more recent arrivals.
http://mailman.rwth-aachen.de/pipermail/procmail/2016-June/date.html
confirms that the most recent post is Fri Jun 3 00:56:14 CEST 2016.
Gabriel, it is a low-traffic list, so a quiet period does not confirm
that the list is down. Would you like to post a query, then we'll see.
Patrick, could you please confirm newer traffic? As a long-term
subscriber, I'd be irked by having been spontaneously dropped off.
There's then also be the archive to be fixed.
You will forgive "senior" memory :)

You are correct, last I have archived but not necessarily last mail there,
is:
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 2016 16:56:14 -0600
From: "@lbutlr" <***@kreme.com>
To: ***@lists.RWTH-Aachen.de
Subject: Re: Working sms time check?
--
(paka)Patrick Shanahan Plainfield, Indiana, USA @ptilopteri
http://en.opensuse.org openSUSE Community Member facebook/ptilopteri
http://wahoo.no-ip.org Photo Album: http://wahoo.no-ip.org/gallery2
Registered Linux User #207535 @ http://linuxcounter.net
Erik Christiansen
2016-08-06 11:21:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Patrick Shanahan
You will forgive "senior" memory :)
Am bailing out the same canoe daily, here.
The stuff which has moved from memory to "forgettery" is horrifying.
The only saving grace is that most of it comes back with a peek at old
notes, and a bit of keyboard thumping.

Erik

c***@zip.com.au
2016-08-03 05:03:17 UTC
Permalink
This post might be inappropriate. Click to display it.
Yubin Ruan
2016-08-03 23:52:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Post by c***@zip.com.au
to match messages with that in the To or CC headers.
I have tried that, but when I press that ~ key, mutt give me some "key is not
bound. Press ? for help" message.(when I say I press the ~ key, I mean I press
<shift>~ , which would give you a ~ when you do normal typing, otherwise it's
just a ` )
Ah. The string above is a pattern expression. It is only meaningful
at the prompt for <tag-pattern> or <limit> or searching. So what I
so that the "T" (<tag-pattern>) opens the prompt requesting a
pattern, and only _then_ do you type the pattern "~C
You might also want to experiment with "l" (<limit>), which
restricts your view of the mailbox to just the messages matching a
pattern. This will give you an easy way to experiment with patterns,
and is also a handy way to locate particular messages in a large
mailbox. Use the pattern "." to undo a "limit": that is a regexp for
"any character", and effectively matches every message.
I have to say that `T~C mutt-***@mutt.org` have make my life a lot easier.
Thanks!
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
That's weird. I have no idea why, but I guess maybe that's because of
set index_format='%-20.20L %4C [%Z] %{%b %d} %-15.15F (%?l?%4l&%4c?) %s'
color index green default ~N # new
color index red default ~D # deleted
color index brightmagenta default ~T # tagged
color index brightyellow default ~F # flagged
set pager_index_lines=10
bind index,pager \Ck sidebar-prev #previous folder in sidebar
bind index,pager \Cj sidebar-next #next folder in sidebar
bind index,pager \CO sidebar-open #open selected folder in sidebar
macro index b '<enter-command>toggle sidebar_visible<enter><refresh>'
macro index \cb '<enter-command>toggle sidebar_visible<enter><refresh>'
bind index d display-message
bind index gg first-entry
bind index G last-entry
bind index h noop
bind index l noop
that's all of my conf that are related to index view. Anything wrong ?
There's nothing wrong there, but I would feel unhappy about the "d"
macro above. Normally "d" is bound to <delete-message>, so if you
every open someone else's mutt, or open your own but bypassing the
configuration above (which sometimes one wants to do), then "d" can
easily lead to accidental deletion of messages.
Normally <enter> will display a message, and i would advocate
removing your "d" macro and just using <enter>. Safer all around.
yes, I think you are right. I'm kind of mixing all those stuff now...
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Can anyone tell me,
** How can I have that Thunderbird message filtering in mutt?(i.e., moving
some messages from inbox to other mailbox according to the `To` field or `Cc`
field)
- move ("save" in mutt parlance) these messages to another folder.
The key "s" is bound to <save-message>. Normally that operates on
the current message. What you want is to operate on all the tagged
messages. This is done by prefixing the command with ";" which is
bound to <tag-prefix>. You can do this with many operations (copy,
;s
meaning <tag-prefix><save>. This will prompt you for a folder name
for the messages.
Post by Yubin Ruan
If there's some common practice I would really appreciate to hear some. Figuring
it out myself is kind of hard.
The practice varies very widely.
Many people use mutt to connect directly to IMAP servers such as GMail.
Alternatively, you arrange to collect your email from such servers
(or your ISP's POP service, etc) and store it locally. Then use mutt
to browse the local folders. Note here that mutt tends not to do the
collecting, though it has pop and imap services and you _can_
collect with mutt.
Of course, you can use mutt to connect to an IMAP service and copy
messages to local folders or vice versa.
Finally, there is some middle group. Using tools like offline-imap
you can mirror your IMAP service (GMail) to local folders and use
- you have local email, which you can browse and read and reply to
if you are offline, such as I am on a train with only my laptop
- you still have your IMAP service which you can access with a
normal GUI mail client (TBird, Apple Mail, etc) or via the web
(mail.google.com) or from your phone
Essentially mutt is a mail reader which will talk to local folders
and/or remote IMAP services.
Fortunately, after a few googling and combining all those info I have gathered,
I find something like this:

push '<tag-pattern>~Cmutt-***@mutt.org<enter>;simaps://***@imap.gmail.com/mutt-users<enter>y'

I put this in my .muttrc, and every time I open mutt, it would automatically
move all the messages which are `To: mutt-***@mutt.org` or `Cc:
mutt-***@mutt.org` to the mutt-users folder. Although it does it remotely,
which would slow thing down when the network connection is not so good, I pretty
satisfied with this. Although something like procmail of offline-mail would make
thing faster, that would make it much complicated for now, so I would rather
settle down.

Anyway, thank you!

regards,
Ruan
c***@zip.com.au
2016-08-04 00:38:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yubin Ruan
Fortunately, after a few googling and combining all those info I have gathered,
I would be inclined to replace the ";" with "<tag-prefix>" and the "s" with
"<save-message>". Just to make it all clear, and to avoid damage by any macro
definition you might make. I tend to either spell it all out with <blah> or
(for very short macros) to be entirely keystrokes (I have a couple of macros
for the "message" view that are just bound to "q" and the same thing in the
index view i.e. "quit the message view and do what would happen in the index
view".
Post by Yubin Ruan
I put this in my .muttrc, and every time I open mutt, it would automatically
which would slow thing down when the network connection is not so good,
You might be surprised. If all the work is being done by the imap server and
the messages are not being pulled down to mutt and pushed back up things should
be pretty fast even on a poor connection.
Post by Yubin Ruan
I pretty
satisfied with this. Although something like procmail of offline-mail would make
thing faster, that would make it much complicated for now, so I would rather
settle down.
Indeed. Get comfortable before making your life even more complex.

Cheers,
Cameron Simpson <***@zip.com.au>
Yubin Ruan
2016-08-04 04:44:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Fortunately, after a few googling and combining all those info I have gathered,
I would be inclined to replace the ";" with "<tag-prefix>" and the
"s" with "<save-message>". Just to make it all clear, and to avoid
damage by any macro definition you might make. I tend to either
spell it all out with <blah> or (for very short macros) to be
entirely keystrokes (I have a couple of macros for the "message"
view that are just bound to "q" and the same thing in the index view
i.e. "quit the message view and do what would happen in the index
view".
Post by Yubin Ruan
I put this in my .muttrc, and every time I open mutt, it would automatically
which would slow thing down when the network connection is not so good,
You might be surprised. If all the work is being done by the imap
server and the messages are not being pulled down to mutt and pushed
back up things should be pretty fast even on a poor connection.
That trick did work, but there still exists some problems when I put more than
one `push` command in my .muttrc:
push '<tag-pattern>~Cmutt-***@mutt.org<enter>;simaps://***@imap.gmail.com/mutt-users<enter>y'
push '<tag-pattern>~Cmutt-***@mutt.org<enter>;simaps://***@imap.gmail.com/mutt-dev<enter>y'
push '<tag-pattern>~f....'
...
(just as an example)
It seem like that the `push` command would not block when the preceding one is
not finished, which result in that those tagged message would NOT be saved to
the appropriate folder. That means, for example, those mails that
belong to `mutt-users`
folder would now be saved to the `mutt-dev` folder, which is probably because
the second `push` take effect before the first one can finish and the first
<save-message> never get a chance to take effect.

any idea?

regards,
Ruan
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Fortunately, after a few googling and combining all those info I have gathered,
push
I would be inclined to replace the ";" with "<tag-prefix>" and the "s" with
"<save-message>". Just to make it all clear, and to avoid damage by any
macro definition you might make. I tend to either spell it all out with
<blah> or (for very short macros) to be entirely keystrokes (I have a couple
of macros for the "message" view that are just bound to "q" and the same
thing in the index view i.e. "quit the message view and do what would happen
in the index view".
Post by Yubin Ruan
I put this in my .muttrc, and every time I open mutt, it would automatically
which would slow thing down when the network connection is not so good,
You might be surprised. If all the work is being done by the imap server and
the messages are not being pulled down to mutt and pushed back up things
should be pretty fast even on a poor connection.
Post by Yubin Ruan
I pretty
satisfied with this. Although something like procmail of offline-mail would make
thing faster, that would make it much complicated for now, so I would rather
settle down.
Indeed. Get comfortable before making your life even more complex.
Cheers,
c***@zip.com.au
2016-08-04 07:08:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Yubin Ruan
Post by c***@zip.com.au
Post by Yubin Ruan
Fortunately, after a few googling and combining all those info I have gathered,
I would be inclined to replace the ";" with "<tag-prefix>" and the
"s" with "<save-message>". Just to make it all clear, and to avoid
damage by any macro definition you might make. I tend to either
spell it all out with <blah> or (for very short macros) to be
entirely keystrokes (I have a couple of macros for the "message"
view that are just bound to "q" and the same thing in the index view
i.e. "quit the message view and do what would happen in the index
view".
Post by Yubin Ruan
I put this in my .muttrc, and every time I open mutt, it would automatically
which would slow thing down when the network connection is not so good,
You might be surprised. If all the work is being done by the imap
server and the messages are not being pulled down to mutt and pushed
back up things should be pretty fast even on a poor connection.
That trick did work, but there still exists some problems when I put more than
push '<tag-pattern>~f....'
...
(just as an example)
It seem like that the `push` command would not block when the preceding one is
not finished, which result in that those tagged message would NOT be saved to
the appropriate folder. That means, for example, those mails that
belong to `mutt-users`
folder would now be saved to the `mutt-dev` folder, which is probably because
the second `push` take effect before the first one can finish and the first
<save-message> never get a chance to take effect.
any idea?
Two issues to be aware of:

- the entire muttrc runs before the keyboard stream starts being processed,
and push just inserts text into the front of that stream. So the push
command does not act until the muttrc has been processed.

- each push command pushes onto the _front_ of the keyboard stream

That second part is important: _after_ the above push commands your keyboard
stream looks like this:

<tag-pattern>~f....
<tag-pattern>~Cmutt-***@mutt.org<enter>;simaps://***@imap.gmail.com/mutt-dev<enter>y
<tag-pattern>~Cmutt-***@mutt.org<enter>;simaps://***@imap.gmail.com/mutt-users<enter>y

because the last push command to execute as your:

push '<tag-pattern>~f....'

This means that your "<tag-pattern>~f...." is the first thing to happen. Mutt
_does_ wait for each command, but they aren't happening in the order you
expected.

Cheers,
Cameron Simpson <***@zip.com.au>
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